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Posts Tagged ‘jLinq.jQuery

Waiter, There Is Some jQuery In My jLinq…

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jLinq occasionally gets confused as a plug-in for jQuery. Unfortunately, jLinq doesn’t do much to help performing queries in jLinq. I’ve written some extension methods before to help link the two together but they were packaged with other projects (and not really ever released)

So this weekend I put together a few helpful extension methods and released them on GitHub.

Naturally, you’ll need the core jLinq library and the jLinq.jQuery library along with jQuery. Since a lot of jQuery uses chained methods you’ll need to use the special invoke syntax for jLinq queries (just an array).

Here are some of the commands you can use.

  • jlinq.$([selector]) : Starts a new query from document.body with the starting selector (if any).
  • $(selector).query([selector]) : Starts a new query from the current jQuery object. Allows an optional selector.
  • .include(selector, [jQuery Object]) : Includes the matches of the provided selector into the current query. You can use a different jQuery object as the source (otherwise it defaults to the object that started the query).
  • .get([selector]) : Converts the current matches in the query to a jQuery object. Allows an optional selector to further filter the results.

Just as a reminder, in order to invoke methods within a query you need to use an array where the first value is the name of the method and following values are the arguments. These arguments are all where the field name would normally be. Here are a few examples in case you need them.


//Example 1: Non-method query
jlinq.from(data).contains(
    "fieldName", //the field to pull the value from
    "check for this" //the argument for contains
    );

// Example 2 : No arguments
// function test() { ... }
jlinq.from(data).contains(
    ["test"], //no arguments, but still an invoke
    "check for this" //the argument for contains
    );

// Example 3 : With arguments
// function test(arg1, arg2) { ... }
jlinq.from(data).contains(
    ["test", 33, false], //the method with arguments
    "check for this" //the argument for contains
    );

So what do these new methods look like? Well here are a few examples to get you started!


//finds all .result elements containing red or green
//and is also case-insensitive
jlinq.$("div.results")
    .contains(["text"], "red")
    .or("green")
    .get()
    .appendTo(document.body);

//finds all links pointing to MP3 files then sorts and styles them
var mp3Links = jlinq.$("a")
    .endsWith(["attr","href"], ".mp3")
    .sort(["text"])
    .get()
    .css({
        color:"#f00",
        fontWeight:"bold"
    });

//highlights all of the matching markup with 'Joe Smith'
$("div.result").query()
    .contains(["html"], "Joe Smith")
    .each(function(rec) { 
        var markup = rec.html()
            .replace(/Joe Smith/g, 
                "<span class='highlight'>Joe Smith</span>");
        rec.html(markup); 
        });

Now you can enjoy the awesomeness of jQuery along with the semi-usefulness of jLinq! You have access to ‘or’-ing, case insensitivity, sorting — It is all there!

This code is all brand new so I don’t recommend using it anywhere important just yet, but it is fun to see how jLinq can make queries a little bit easier.

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Written by hugoware

September 26, 2010 at 10:18 pm